Supervirgin's blog of awesometastic adventures

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12093

(Source: fucktsunderes)

Reblogged 17 minutes ago from michikomalandroid
38855

stunningpicture:

Me (located in Iceland) and my friend (located in New Zealand) made the biggest sandwich of all time.

Reblogged 18 minutes ago from michikomalandroid
1164

toonami:

officialusuniki:

Use this!

THERE ARE TITANS OUT THERE!

Reblogged 19 minutes ago from toonami
396

nevver:

Stay home, Famous landmarks zoomed out

Reblogged 20 minutes ago from nevver

39077

robonoise:

fucking destroy the idea that teenage girls fake their sexualities and are only queer for attention

Reblogged 6 hours ago from thebeatleswereterrible
6882

teairachanel:

Janelle Monae ThePassionista Photographed by: Meredith Jenks

(Source: the-monae)

Reblogged 11 hours ago from michikomalandroid
120045

thisandthathistoryblog:

hjuliana:

dancingspirals:

ironychan:

hungrylikethewolfie:

dduane:

A loaf of bread made in the first century AD, which was discovered at Pompeii, preserved for centuries in the volcanic ashes of Mount Vesuvius. The markings visible on the top are made from a Roman bread stamp, which bakeries were required to use in order to mark the source of the loaves, and to prevent fraud. (via Ridiculously Interesting)

(sigh) I’ve seen these before, but this one’s particularly beautiful.

I feel like I’m supposed to be marveling over the fact that this is a loaf of bread that’s been preserved for thousands of years, and don’t get me wrong, that’s hella cool.  But honestly, I’m mostly struck by the unexpected news that “bread fraud” was apparently once a serious concern.

Bread Fraud was a huge thing,  Bread was provided to the Roman people by the government - bakers were given grain to make the free bread, but some of them stole the government grain to use in other baked goods and would add various substitutes, like sawdust or even worse things, to the bread instead.  So if people complained that their free bread was not proper bread, the stamp told them exactly whose bakery they ought to burn down.

Bread stamps continued to be used at least until the Medieval period in Europe. Any commercially sold bread had to be stamped with an official seal to identify the baker to show that it complied with all rules and regulations about size, price, and quality. This way, rotten or undersized loaves could be traced back to the baker. Bakers could be pilloried, sent down the streets in a hurdle cart with the offending loaf tied around their neck, fined, or forbidden to engage in baking commercially ever again in that city. There are records of a baker in London being sent on a hurdle cart because he used an iron rod to increase the weight of his loaves, and another who wrapped rotten dough with fresh who was pilloried. Any baker hurdled three times had to move to a new city if they wanted to continue baking.

If you have made bread, you are probably familiar with a molding board. It’s a flat board used to shape the bread. Clever fraudsters came up with a molding board that had a little hole drilled into it that wasn’t easily noticed. A customer would buy his dough by weight, and then the baker would force some of that dough through the hole, so they could sell and underweight loaf and use the stolen dough to bake new loafs to sell. Molding boards ended up being banned in London after nine different bakers were caught doing this. There were also instances of grain sellers withholding grain to create an artificial scarcity drive up the price of that, and things like bread.

Bread, being one of the main things that literally everyone ate in many parts of the world, ended up with a plethora of rules and regulations. Bakers were probably no more likely to commit fraud than anyone else, but there were so many of them, that we ended up with lots and lots of rules and records of people being shifty.

Check out Fabulous Feasts: Medieval Cookery and Ceremony by Madeleine Pelner Cosman for a whole chapter on food laws as they existed in about 1400. Plus the color plates are fantastic.

ALL OF THIS IS SO COOL

I found something too awesome not share with you! 

I’m completely fascinated by the history of food, could I choose a similar topic for my Third Year Dissertation? Who knows, but it is very interesting all the same!

(Source: wine-loving-vagabond)

Reblogged 11 hours ago from thebeatleswereterrible

Student kicked out of her prom for wearing pants

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socialismartnature:

"The latest tale of gender policing at prom comes from Cherryville High School in North Carolina, where high school senior Shafer Rupard was kicked out of her prom for wearing…pants."
Reblogged 11 hours ago from michikomalandroid

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yakfrost:

avril lavigne is 29 that’s too fucking old to be goin through a weaboo phase

Reblogged 12 hours ago from michikomalandroid
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(Source: liftingbiobabe)

Reblogged 12 hours ago from tastefullyoffensive
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kunt-kardashian:

(Source: drinkingfortwo)

Reblogged 12 hours ago from beyoncebeytwice
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vinebox:

White girls Vs Black girls being accused of talking shit

Reblogged 12 hours ago from beyoncebeytwice
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kirby-star-rider:

prozdvoices:

Request: Goofy sings BRING ME TO LIFE

image

Anonymous asked:

I know you get asked to do Goofy too much, but a cover of Bring Me to Life would be hilarious <3

Let me transport you to a simpler time, where you’re putting the final touches on your Inuyasha AMV in Windows Movie Maker.

Welcome back to 2003.

LMAO LOLOLOL

Reblogged 12 hours ago from michikomalandroid
1903

samelba:

I loved these books!

Reblogged 12 hours ago from horrormoviefan97
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(Source: sexhaver)

Reblogged 12 hours ago from thebeatleswereterrible
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